Winter 2020

Issue 12.1 Winter 2020

Editorial

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Colleagues,

Despite a long and very proud association with NADP and, indeed, the Journal itself, this is my first time as Editor – don’t ask me why, just one of those things, but I am so glad that I now have the honour of undertaking this role.

I always imagined that it would prove to be an interesting learning opportunity but, given the context we are all now living through, I think I have been handed an even greater learning experience. I suspect that this edition of the Journal will be eagerly anticipated and I strongly believe it will prove to be no disappointment.

It is no surprise and entirely appropriate that these extraordinary times are reflected in all but one of the pieces in the peer-reviewed section of this edition of the Journal and for this reason I have placed that one piece right at the forefront. It was a pleasure to read Clare Omissi’s thoughtful and insightful analysis of the impacts of inclusive practice developments on the volume of reasonable adjustments. It is a subject close to my heart but it was also nice to read something that wasn’t Covid-related.

We then start the deep dive into the myriad of ways in which Covid-19 has affected our practice and the experience of disabled students. Dr Jan Adams has produced two pieces for us, the first of which gives us a valuable overview of DSA support in the Covid world and the second, later in the Journal, a more targeted look at the provision of mentoring and study skills.

A subject that will run and run, I believe, is from Daniela de Silva and Dr Claire Robertson regarding the sudden and widespread provision of 24 hr exams – blessing or nightmare for disabled students?

Next comes an impairment specific piece from Dr Nicola Martin and Harriet Cannon taking a really useful and practical look at how to support autistic students during this pandemic followed by the aforementioned second piece by Dr Jan Adams.

Finally, in this section Lynn Wilson gives us a valuable analysis and breakdown of different platforms and how to make sure that conferences, webinars and events are as accessible as possible. I suspect many of us will be keeping this piece at our elbows in the coming months.

The Journal closes with a heartfelt parental perspective on the many difficulties and positive suggestions for VI students entering and passing through UK higher education, followed by 3 book reviews which I’m sure will motivate you to run out to your nearest bookshop… ahem!

I sincerely hope you enjoy reading this Journal as much as I have and it would be remiss of me not to thank each and every one of our contributors who help to make this possible. The authors of course for their hard work and generosity in sharing their learning and those who write the book reviews and help us make those tricky decisions regarding what to read next. I am also hugely grateful to those behind the scenes who do the hard yards and are so vital – the peer reviewers, proof readers and my colleagues on the publications committee. Finally, last but not least, the unparalleled support of the NADP Office team.

It is the kindness and support of these people that ensure we are able to produce this Journal as open access – we are always open to offers of help, however small so if you feel you can, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Thank you all

Paddy Turner

Editor

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Articles

Section 1: Peer Reviewed Articles

Omissi, C. (2020) From reasonable adjustments to inclusive practice: has the increased emphasis on inclusive learning reduced the need for reasonable adjustments for disabled students in UK HEIs? Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 5-25.

Adams, J. (2020) DSA support for disabled students in higher education in UK: challenges, recommendations and future directions. (Research Series: part 1 or 6). Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 26-45.

De Silva, D. & Robertson, C. (2020) 24-hour exams – blessing in disguise for inclusive assessments or a logistical nightmare for higher education? Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 46-64.

Martin, N. & Cannon, C. (2020) Studying during the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic: suggestions for autistic university students. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 65-86.

Adams, J. (2020) DSA support for disabled students in higher education in UK: the contribution of specialist mentoring. (Research Series: part 2 of 6). Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 87-105.

Wilson, L. (2020) Making Online Conferencing Accessible: Platforms, Captions and Transcripts. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 106-117.

Section 2: Practitioner-focused papers

Dracott, J. (2020) Supporting visually impaired students in Higher Education – A parent and practitioner perspective. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 118-129.

Section 3: Book Reviews

Kolontari, F. (2020) Book review 1: Neurodiversity Studies (eds. Hanna Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Nick Chown and Anna Stenning, 2020). Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 130-132.

Healey, C. (2020) Book review 2: Slorach, R. (2016) A Very Capitalist Condition – A history and politics of disability. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 133-134.

Healey, C. (2020) Book review 3: Praske, N. (2020) LOVE in the present tense. A bereaved mum’s story. A true story of loss and grief for all cancer care professionals. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 12:1 pp. 135-137.