June 2019

Issue 11.1 June 2019

Editorial

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Welcome to the latest edition of The Journal of Inclusive Practice in  Further and Higher Education (JIPFHE). Thank you to our contributing authors and editorial team with particular thanks to Lynn Wilson from the office for coordinating everything as well as providing editorial input, and to Dr. John Conway for providing essential backup and having the ability to proofread effectively.

The fine collection of papers here reflect NADP’s ethos in relation to evidence-based research informed inclusive practice. The student’s voice underpins research work presented in this edition and the principle of ‘nothing about us without us’ is in evidence as usual. Universal Design for Learning is increasingly referenced in work submitted to JIPFHE.  This is a reflection of the times. Quirke et al.. usefully consider UDL in relation to the university community rather than focussing exclusively on curriculum and pedagogy.  Intersectionality is becoming a more prominent concern.

The paper by Quirke et al. reflects the Irish perspective and follows a more international language than is currently preferred in the UK – the variation in preferred use of language was reviewed by Wilson & Martin in their paper “Models of Disability affect Language: Implications for Disability, Equality and Inclusivity Practice” in the last issue of JPFHE (vol 10.1 page 4-19)

The Leadley Meade and Goodwin paper, Quirke et al.. and Soorenian’s contribution specifically consider aspects of identity beyond disability and the interrelatedness of factors which can impact on student success. Ravet’s book (reviewed by the editor) is a timely reminder of the necessity to think carefully about transitions particularly in relation to moving on to employment. Another timely reminder is presented in Benoist’s research on the potential disconnects which can cause delays in the DSA process making the transition into higher education bumpier than it could be.

All the papers presented here have something practical to offer. Readers may take from them something to inform practice and or ideas about possible approaches to research. Articles are selected because of their potential to inform practice and authors should keep this in mind. The Editorial Guidelines at the end of this edition are very specific about the purpose of JIPFHE in relation to informing practice. The Editorial Board anticipates that readers will find this edition thought-provoking and helpful.

Professor Nicola Martin, London South Bank University

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Articles

Leadley-Meade, Z. & Goodwin, R. (2019) Pre-entry self-assessment and mapping to relevant services as a means of developing learner autonomy in undergraduates. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 11.1. pp. 4-13. Word download

Soorenian, A. (2019) Personal Assistant scheme: help or hindrance? Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 11.1. pp. 14-28. Word Download

Quirke, M., McCarthy., P., Treanor, D. & Mc Guckin, C. (2019) Tomorrows Disability Officer – A Cornerstone on the Universal Design Campus. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 11.1. pp. 29-42. Word Download

Benoist, F. (2019) Students’ experience of accessing support at university. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 11.1. pp. 43-51. Word Download

Ravet, J. & Martin, N.(2019) Book Review: Ravet, J. Supporting Change in Autism Services: Bridging the Gap Between Theory & Practice (2015), London: Routledge. Title: Supporting Change in Autism Services: Bridging the Gap Between Theory & Practice (2015), London: Routledge. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 11.1. pp. 52-53. Word Document

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