JIPFHE 14.1 Summer 2022

Editorial

Dr John Conway, Vice Chair, NADP

Once again we have a bumper issue of contributions from the membership across a wide range of topics relevant to supporting disabled students in FE and HE even to expanding our remit to cover education within the prison environment.

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This has been a strange year, as HEPs – and their students – struggle to recover from the restriction imposed by COVID.  From “normal” teaching practices most had withdrawn to on-line or other forms of remote teaching which seriously impacted both the learning experience and almost eliminated social interaction.  The latter is a very important facet of learning in many subjects / courses where students learn from each other, help each other or work in teams and are able to meet with their lecturers for discussions and tutorials.  Restricted to on-line conversations with their lecturers, much must have been lost.  This last year has seen a gradual return to “normality” – though of course that has provoked in some circles a discussion as to whether “normality” is appropriate any more.  Was this a (missed?) opportunity to question the accessibility of “normal” educational practices? 

The Disabled Student Commission has just issued its ‘Commitment’ as I write this [15/7/22] which represents an interesting approach, in effect requiring everybody [people and organisations] to commit to recognise the different experiences of disabled students and provide an understanding, welcoming, accessible environment and experience from thinking about HE to having employment afterwards.  Sadly, in my opinion, it is lacking one word, ‘inclusive’.   They seek NADP’s endorsement: our entire history including the papers in this edition of the journal has been to seek out, develop and promote such an environment for (disabled) students.

John Harding in his article states “where the principles of Universal or inclusive design are not applied to educational settings, disabled students face barriers to equitable access to their teaching and learning creating an Educational Disability Penalty”

The other news this week is the resignation of our prime minister – is it too much to hope for a focus on inclusive education and inclusive employment as a way out of the country’s difficulties in the leadership contest?

Our papers this time are largely personal experience / views of members.  It is great to see so many members reflecting on aspects of support facilities / systems / students’ needs especially at time when we are so pressurised in our jobs – perhaps this is a result of the numbers seeking accreditation?  Do read through, consider what can be adopted / adapted to your situation – maybe consider writing a piece for the next edition?

John Conway,

Vice Chair, NADP.

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Articles

Wrigley, J. (2022) How can we affect change in Higher Education to benefit disabled students and why do we need to? Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 7-16

Harding, J. (2022) “There is a way out of every box, a solution to every puzzle; it’s just a matter of finding it.” The Educational Disability Penalty (EDP) and the future of disability provision in tertiary education. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 17-35

Hopp, S. (2022) Looking in the mirror: A Reflection on the Doctoral Journey, Learning Difference and Intersectionality. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 36-46

McGladdery, G. (2022) The Rise of Degree and Higher Degree Apprenticeships: Challenge or Opportunity?   Reflections from a Service Perspective at Nottingham Trent University.  Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 47-55

Crawley, S., Marsh N. & Nind R. (2022) Creating and Developing Our Inclusive Assistive Technology Offer at Sheffield Hallam University, 2017-2022.  Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 56-65

Lawrence, C. (2022) Our Autism Resources Community Hub: a celebration. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 66- 75

Cannon, H. (2022) Considerations of Extra Time for Online Assessments. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 76-79

Chapman, A. (2022) Impact of chronic spontaneous conditions during study – a personal reflection with considerations for disability practitioners.  Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 80-88

Kay, H. (2022) The mental health of students: where do we go?  Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 89-96

Newman, I. (2022) Water Cooler Moments:  Informal learning opportunities, study-buddies and COVID ‘lockdowns’ in Higher Education institutions.  Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 97-103

Jones, K. (2022) Caught in the Middle. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 104-111

Webster, J., Snell, L., Barnes, L. & Caudrelier, G. (2022) The changing role of specialist support professionals for deaf students in higher education. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 112-129

Holmes, R. (2022) “My students say ‘you get me’”: Benefits of autistic mentors for autistic students in Higher Education. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 130-148

Dolan-Martin, D. & Martin, N. (2022) Inclusive Adult Educational Opportunities within the Criminal Justice System: Reflecting on the work of the charity Theatre in Prison and Probation (TiPP). Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 149-169

Ida, DL., Waldock, K. & Bass, S. (2022) ‘Responsiveness as Responsibility’- a method for inclusivity. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 170-187

Abbott-Jones, A. (2022) Book Review:  Dyslexia in Higher Education: anxiety and coping skills. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 188-189

STAMMA., Stammerers Through University Consultancy., London South Bank University (2022). Supporting Students Who Stammer in Higher Education. London South Bank University. v.1.2. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 190-234

Wray, M. NADP briefing relating to the Office for Students report: ‘Assessment practices in English higher education providers: spelling, punctuation and grammar’. Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education. Issue 14.1 pp 235 – 241